Wednesday, March 30, 2011

Plan A Failed, On To Plan B

Plan A: Recover the bench, without removing the original fabric, with a layer of foam and batting, after filling in the tufted areas with shredded foam.


Looking good so far. (I think I was distracted by how pretty the green bands looked!)


But at this point I probably should have taken a step back to analyzed the progress...


...but I'm always in a hurry.


However, when I finished stapling on the batting I knew something was off.


My heart was telling me it was too bulky (Hum, really?! I should have stopped to take a look at the above photo of where I want this bench to go!) but my head wanted to figure out how to make it work, because I didn't want to start over. It irritated me all day and that night I went to bed thinking about it. But I woke up with the solution. I think. 


So right after the kids got on the bus at 7:30 I was back to work on the bench, undoing the efforts of the previous day. All the stables, foam and batting were removed to give Plan B a try.


Which is this: remove the buttons and original material, and work with the existing foam so that the thinner profile and curved corners, which give the bench its lovely lines and good proportions, are not lost.


Happily it took less than an hour to get to this point, so I stopped being irritated with myself that I'd wasted time. Better to stop, backtrack and redo than forge ahead and be unhappy with the final result!


Taking the bag of shredded foam...


...all the holes were tightly filled.


I'm just going to sit back and see how much the foam "relaxes", now that the original material is not pressing down on it creating the indentations. I'm thinking it will spring back a little, but not all the way. I've got a couple ideas about how to deal with this issue, but learning from the experience with Plan A, I'm going to think about it for a day before proceeding!

42 comments :

  1. I'm glad you are doing this first, so I can learn from you! I have no idea how I would proceed. Love that you tackle such projects.

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  2. I think we share a similar thought process, only I put off projects because I don't want to waste time by re-doing. You were smart to keep the lines of the original bench. I like where this is going.

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  3. I wouldn't have thought to leave the original foam. I would have stripped that bench down to the bones. New foam, batting, fabric, done! I'm anxious to see if your method works. I'm just sorry it's been so much work for you.
    Also...it appears you are not tufting your new bench. That's probably a good thing because that's where crumbs end up.

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  4. It's a good thing you did notice it, Janell! I could just see myself NOT noticing that until I was all done.

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  5. I love reading the trials and tribulations of other designers :) It makes me feel more "normal" and not a complete mess! Good for you for stepping back and realizing that you should take a few steps backward- I applaud you and cannot wait to see how this bench turns out!

    abodelove.blogspot.com

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  6. Sometimes we just have to learn by trial and error. You had a good idea, just an uncooperative bench! This is looking better...guess your going to wrap it in batting? You might try a thin (really thin) layer of foam as well. I'm sure you'll work through it and come out highly successful as you always do. Can't wait to see what you've planned.

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  7. I couldn't notice the bulky-ness but I was thinking about the new foam sliding on the old material (leather?) with use. I think we all have a "Quick Plan A" then step back and proceed with "Better Plan B!" Look forward to seeing the end!

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  8. I think we are on the same wave length today! I posted about a project going wrong, too!

    You made a good choice by removing what you had originally done. I kept going and hated the end result! So now I have to start over completely:(

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  9. Too funny Lakeitha, I was JUST this second over at your blog leaving nearly an identical comment. DIY projects don't always go as smoothly as we wish!! Janell

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  10. Great advice! It's always better to slow down and do something "right" than to forge ahead knowing you will be disappointed with the results. Knowing your handiness, this bench will look fantastic for sure!

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  11. I'm so sorry you had to un-do all of your work from yesterday but looks like you're on the right track now. Can't wait to see the final product!!
    xo~
    T

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  12. Good luck. Taking a couple days off may be just what you need.

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  13. I am always in a hurry too! I am excited to see :)

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  14. I have done that...the minute the kids are out the door! Hurry, hurry, work ,work...This will work out...Just remember, starting again, is moving forward!!!

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  15. I have a project that I'm kind of in limbo on, and your comment about backtracking and redoing it vs. being unhappy with the final result really struck a chord with me. Good perspective as always!

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  16. as always, I can't wait to see the final result!

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  17. I too hurry. I am re-upholstering a Louis XIV arm chair {not sure how old it is as I found straw as stuffing!} and it is being done by trial and error. I don't know HOW many times I have removed the staples! Now I am on the back and am not sure how to proceed. That's where the internet comes in handy!

    Looking forward to seeing what your solution is!

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  18. I give you credit! I wouldn't know where to begin quite honestly. I would be freaking out but I can see you know what you are doing and are determined and there is no doubt in my mind that the end result is going to be fantabulous! Can't wait to see!

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  19. i did something similar recently. i filled the holes with batting like that and then took a sheet of quilt batting and wrapped it around it. that really helped hide indentations. best of luck, love how the legs turned out!

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  20. Thinking of you as I am also recovering a chair. (Is there an icon for pulling out one's hair??) A thin layer of cotton batting might solve this problem (if the "relaxing" plan doesn't work.

    Warmly, Michelle

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  21. Part of my problem is I take entirely to long to do anything. The engineer in me has to analyze a project from every angle. I'm currently trying out your faux crown molding technique in my office and its taking me forever to just tape of the room. I had to sit in the middle of the floor and think through the process first.

    I'm sure your bench will be fabulous when your finished.

    -Kheushla

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  22. That's really good advice...to stop and make it right instead of forging ahead. So many times I'm determined to get a project done in a given block of time that I don't abide by that!

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  23. That is the best advice...just wait and think it through. The answer will come to you...sometimes you just need to step away for a little bit.

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  24. I don't think I would have noticed until it was too late - Nice recovery. You always find a way to see things through. It is looking good!

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  25. Honestly, I probably would have forged ahead knowing it was off, but thinking it would magically work out anyway.You are a more patient woman than I am.Have a beautiful day!

    Ann-Marie

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  26. it never goes as planned! ha!
    press on, girl! I KNOW you will make it look wonderful.
    -{darlene}
    fieldstonehilldesign.com

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  27. Ugh! Glad to see you have the same problems, we all have. I just trialed one of the stencils, from Cutting Edge, that you showed. I loved it, but had to re-do it...so defeating, but honestly its how you learn to do it better!! Really love your blog! Thanks.

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  28. You are one smart cookie!! I can't wait to see the finished product :)

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  29. Definitely better to step back and redo than not be happy with the result. I know in the end, that bench is going to be AMAZING- so excited to see it all done!

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  30. Oh, I hate working backwards. I know that when the carpet has indents you can put an ice cube on the spot and it helps to lift the fibers. Could that work with foam? Maybe a light spray...carol

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  31. Could you put a layer or two of quilt batting over the indented foam? It is thin so you wouldn't raise the heighth too much but stiff enough to not get into the indentations. I'm looking forward to seeing the final result!

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  32. I often find that my Plan B is what I envisioned my Plan A to look like in my head, so it's always good to take a breather, step back and examine the situation. As usual, I am excited to see your handiwork!

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  33. I'm super anxious to see the finished product! I have no doubt that you'll figure it all out!

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  34. Hi there Janell~
    I hear you on the issues with re-covering things... especially all those tufts!! I have a little antique tufted settee that I want to re-do at some point too and am kind of avoiding it due to all the tufts it has! lol~So I really can't wait to see how this turns out!! :)

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  35. One thing I learned in my recent upholstery class (through PCC - I would HIGHLY recommend it!)is that steam helps to revive old foam. The trick is to really shove the steamer head into the foam for very short intervals. You don't want your foam to get too wet becuase it will then mold, especially when covered with something like a faux leather that does not breath!

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  36. thanks for "keeping it real"...yes, that's a totally overused phrase i realize, but it just can't be said any easier than that.
    it's refreshing to see that sometimes a project takes a twist and an unforseen turn before it ends up beautiful.
    :)

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  37. Oh, goodness, if only I could tell you how many of my Plan A's have failed! :)

    Kelly

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  38. Sorry you had a set back but I know you'll come up with a fabulous solution... you always do! Can't wait to see the finished project.

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  39. Janell, I am so in awe an proud of your accomplisments like this! Wow!

    I have a Giveaway from The Zhush I know you will love! Come & join!

    xoxo
    Karena
    Art by Karena

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  40. I know this is going to turn out beautifully!

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  41. Steam! Steam will make the foam revert back to its original shape much faster. Use a steamer if you have one....just don't use an iron, or you will melt it and be backt to square one yet again.

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  42. I'm with Kayla. I was actually thinking if you spray a little water on the indents it might just puff up with the steam.
    Good luck.

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